10 comments

  • 0
    Avatar
    Magda Falcone

    Ciao Enrico,

    non riesco a visualizzare i link. Ricevo il seguente messaggio di errore:

    "Ooops la pagina che cerchi non é stata trovata!

    Le cause possibili sono:

    • La pagina é momentaneamente offline per allestimento;
    • L'indirizzo che hai digitato non é corretto (attenzione: ricordati di rispettare le lettere maiuscole e minuscole);
    • La pagina non esiste piú".

    Per favore, puoi controllare i link? 

    Grazie, Magda 

  • 0
    Avatar
    mirko

    @Magda - invece di cliccare i collegamenti, fai copia e incolla nella barra degli indirizzi del browser.

     

    Quanto al topic, secondo me quelle non dovrebbero essere traduzioni di livello 'standard': 0,03 $ a parola possono forse essere giustificabili per testi estremamente semplici e veloci da tradurre (ma quel rate sarebbe comunque troppo basso, imo), ma non certo per contenuti tecnici e/o specialistici, specie poi se il cliente richiede l'utilizzo di una terminologia specifica e la consultazione di dizionari e/o glossari speciali (in realtà penso che anche il livello 'business' gli andrebbe stretto, imo, dato il tipo di contenuti). Io credo di aver accettato un paio di lavori pro da questo cliente, ma non ho più accettato nulla da quando ho visto che aveva aggiunto un glossario che conteneva dei termini che secondo me erano sbagliati.

    A questo proposito, credo che i seguenti thread/post diano qualche indicazione o spiegazione sull'argomento:

    https://support.gengo.com/entries/21103531-Specialist-vocabulary

    https://support.gengo.com/entries/23707773-What-s-your-policy-on-specialist-translations-Will-I-be-held-legally-liable-for-mistranslations-

    https://support.gengo.com/entries/20800476-Can-I-order-a-specialist-translation-legal-technical-or-medical-

    Inoltre, più in generale, "Scientific, technical or specialist texts" rientra tra i casi in cui Gengo dichiaratamente 'non offre servizi di traduzione': http://translate.gengo.com/translation-quality/

  • 0
    Avatar
    Magda Falcone

    Grazie Mirko per la dritta (in effetti ora non ho più problemi di apertura file) e grazie ancora a Enrico per i link :)

  • 0
    Avatar
    Natalia Manidis

    Thanks for responding, Mirko, you raise some valid points. This is actually a hot topic within Gengo at the moment and one of the main discussion points is how we should define specialist. For example, is a specialist text any text that requires the use of a dictionary or a glossary, as you suggest? Or can glossaries and other translation tools be used to make jobs with some specialized vocabulary accessible to Standard-level translators?

    Basically, our hope is that glossaries and other tools we are working on can make jobs such as these less difficult and time consuming. However, it sounds like this has not been your experience so far. We're interested to hear any thoughts from you and others on this thread on how we might be able to improve our approach for next time.

    Thanks again!

  • 0
    Avatar
    mirko

    Indeed Natalia, much depends on how you define "technical" and/or "specialist". For instance, is the localization of an app (or a SAP software, or a video game) a technical or specialist task, or should "technical" and "specialist" only be used to define texts dealing with, I don't know, nuclear physics, rocket science, medicine, and similarly 'higher fields'? Personally, I don't think so, since I believe a nuclear physicist wouldn't necessarily be able to use the same terms and conventions commonly used in software localization. But of course, I don't mean to imply in any way that software localization and the translation of academic papers dealing with nuclear physics are on the same level... but just that they are two different 'specialist' fields...

    In the case the OP was referring to, I believe that the 'specialty' of that copy is highlighted by the fact that a translator is supposed to use a specific dictionary containing terms that are not generally used in everyday speech, but specifically refer to a distinct field, so that makes it a 'specialty dictionary', if you will, just like the one linked by Enrico. I think that's rather different from using a 'generic' dictionary if you're unsure about how to translate "raccoon" or "pineapple", for instance.

    I also think that, while one may argue whether this should be treated as 'business' or 'specialist' tier copy, it should be a given that this shouldn't be classed as 'standard'... and if it is in fact posted as standard, then I feel the translator shouldn't be burdened with 'special requests' (since, as I said, I think that every 'special requests' is a request too many at $ 0.03 psw, at least for people living in countries with 'higher' living costs - no offense meant to anyone, ofc).

    Finally, in my case, I started avoiding those specific jobs because: 1) $0.03 is too low, as I was saying (especially for that copy, imo) and 2) Because even at $0.08 (if I'm not mistaken) I saw some terms in the glossary whose translation was wrong in my opinion, therefore using them would've resulted in a wrong or 'weird' translation...

    More in general, glossaries certainly are a good idea, but they also are a double edged blade, since if terms are entered carelessly (e.g. terms that are either too 'generic' to be in a glossary or have a wrong or ambiguous translation(s), for instance), then they can potentially be more of a problem than a resource. Of course. you could also think "Well, if the customer wants "dog" translated as "Tibetan mastiff", or "juice" as "Piña colada", who am I to question their explicitly stated wishes?", but personally, I'd rather skip the job in that case, rather than provide a translation whose correctness I'm unsure of (and can't really vouch for), or embark on the thankless task of trying to persuade the customer that the term(s) they entered in the glossary is(are) wrong...

  • 0
    Avatar
    smeeko

    One comment I would like to add about topic-specific glossaries and dictionaries is that, when we have customers with projected large volumes over several months, it may helpful to work with the customer in advance to create a glossary that all translators can use. Possibly, even require translators to read the glossary and acknowledge reading the glossary before starting on the first job for that project. 

    My two cents...

    Enrico

  • 0
    Avatar
    mirko

    @Absolutely agree with Enrico on that first suggestion. In my experience, that's how you usually tackle 'bigger' projects when you work in a team, otherwise consistency and accuracy become impossible to attain (at an acceptable level, at least). Since a job on Gengo may be picked up by virtually anyone, keeping consistency at an 'acceptable level' across multiple jobs from the same customer becomes practically impossible (especially if you also take into consideration style, register, usage conventions, etc.), but at least some keywords could be kept the same.

    As for the second part, when you start a translation for which the customer set up a glossary, there already is a three-part popup message telling you you should stick to those terms, and, unless I'm mistaken, generally those words/expressions are already inserted in the source text, so you can't miss them even if you try. However, I don't think that asking to read a whole glossary before starting a translation would be particularly useful or fair to the translator, especially if it's a 50 terms glossary for a $5 (possibly standard) job, for instance... Besides, you don't actually do that even if you're working for an agency (especially since terms/expressions lookup is one of the strong points of CAT tools in the first place).

    Lastly, both consistency and the usage of relevant terminology/style for any given field are certainly objectives every translator should strive for, but let's not forget that, when everything's said and done, this still is a crowdsourcing platform for 'non specialist' copy we're talking about... so if the customer wishes to use glossaries, translation memories, PMs and additional services to get a more reliable/satisfactory result (at least in theory), then they should also be prepared to fork out 3/4x+ what they pay Gengo... and, at any rate, I don't think they can really expect (nor demand) that of a 'standard' (or even 'business'/'ultra') job...

    Once again, all of the above wrapped up in a big fat IMO.

  • 0
    Avatar
    Natalia Manidis

    Thanks you Mirko and Enrico, this is all very helpful information. We want our tools to save (not waste) translators' time while delivering a quality result for the customer. I'll forward your comments on to our project management and product teams. Thanks again and have a great weekend!

  • 0
    Avatar
  • 0
    Avatar
    smeeko

    I just found another useful list of terms that can be used as a reference for this kind of translations.

    Enjoy

    Enrico




    nautica.xlsx
Please sign in to leave a comment.