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As many of you who follow us on Facebook may know, we’ve recently started creating a new series of posts which provide prospective Gengo translators with a closer look at the Gengo translator experience. To help inspire our future posts, we’d love you to share some of the interesting projects that you’ve worked on with us in this short survey

 

Is there a particular translation that’s really stood out in your mind? Has a project sparked an interest in a topic that you hadn’t previously thought about? Do you remember an interesting term that you had to research, or a word or expression that it was difficult to find an equivalent for in your target language?

 

We’d love to hear any and all of your thoughts, and we really appreciate your time and valuable insights. Please note that we may use some of your comments in future posts that we write here and on Facebook, but you have the option of asking us not to mention you by name. When you’re filling out the survey, it’s fine to mention customer names since we will remove these if we use your comments publicly. However, if you choose to respond by commenting on this thread, or in any other public domain, then please do not mention customer names or specific customer content.

 

We can’t wait to hear what you have to tell us!

13件のコメント

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    kevin.thoma88

    I can't remember a specific project or subject area right now, but for a bit of fun: I once had to look up what exactly "Baked Spaghetti" was (because a job mentioned it in passing) and it's now genuinely one of my favourite dishes to cook for myself.

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    Katrina Paterson

    That's fascinating! So it sounds like the translation job actually made a practical difference to your life. Do you boil the spaghetti first before you bake it?

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    Kathleen

    Well, I can't say this was my favorite translation, oh no, but in answer to the question, "Is there a particular translation that’s really stood out in your mind?" one job in particular leapt to mind.

    It was a translation of marketing material for an array of sex toys! Because I'm blushing already, I won't mention any specific terms I needed to look up, if you don't mind.

    One thing I love about gengo is the fact that jobs range "from the ridiculous to the sublime." You never know what's coming down the pike. Boredom is never a problem.

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    Katrina Paterson

    That's really interesting! I think sometimes we've all come across a topic that's been unusual for some reason or another and then we've thought, 'Wow - I would never have imagined myself translating this.' But then in a sense, why would such topics not come up? At the end of the day, any company that's looking to market themselves to an international audience is going to need their content to be translated, and then that's where people like us step in. A long time ago, I worked on a project (not for Gengo) that was about the industrial manufacture of soap powder and at first it sounded like the most banal thing in the world but the more I read of the text, the more I got involved with it. You are right when you say that boredom is not a problem!

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    HAR

    I also discovered a new recipe by working with Gengo.  It's a Dutch dish called Boerenkool Stamppot (don't even know how to pronounce it).  You can google it.  It has become one of my favorite recipes, and my whole family loves it.  But the best part is that it's so easy to make.

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    Leah K.

    My favorite project so far involves translating content about jewelry. The pictures are really what makes it interesting and they also help me out a lot when I am translating.

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    gunnarbu

    Among so many diverse jobs it is hard to pick one single one, but there was a series of short SMS-stories that I really enjoyed, because it was a nice challenge to translate a very verbal and youth-inspired language and then there was the added excitement of seeing how the story ended. Some of them were like mini horror stories. What ever happened to those - I have not seen any for a long while?

    Gunnar

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    Lara Fernandez

    @gunnarbu - Wow, that sounds so cool! If we haven't seen any of those for a while, perhaps the project has ended, but I just wanted to say that a couple of years ago I used to watch a YouTuber who would actually read those types of SMS mini-horror stories on her channel! It would be wild if some of them were actually the ones that you eventually got to translate :) 

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    Chris

    Just saw one of those Gunnar and Lara, so it seems like they are still around. They aren't doing just SMS-stories anymore, but the format remains similar. Assuming we are talking about the same thing, of course.

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    Ellie

    It's going back quite a few years now, but the Gengo job that had the biggest impact upon me was translating the bride's wedding speech for an international marriage. As far as I could tell, she was going to put my translation up as slides for the benefit of her new in-laws while she gave the speech in her native language.

    Linguistically speaking it was a fairly straightforward job, and I don't think I learned anything new from it. I also didn't make very much money, as it was relatively short and this was before the new pay rates came in. Yet it felt strangely profound (as well as profoundly strange) to know that I was translating the most personal, intimate feelings of a complete stranger on one of the most important days of her life, and that my words would be part of a wedding ceremony between two people on the other side of the world who I had never met and never would meet.

    It was the first time I realised how odd it can sometimes be to be a translator, especially when you're operating remotely through a service like Gengo. You pick up a job, people pop open these little windows and let you into all sorts of things that are going on in their lives, and then you send off the job, the window they opened shuts, and you don't hear from them again unless they have something else to be translated and you happen to pick it up. That chance to connect for a fleeting moment with people and experiences I would never otherwise encounter has become one of my favourite things about being a translator in the years since that wedding speech, and when I'm feeling particularly run down, lonely, or unmotivated, I find it somehow encouraging and uplifting to be able to pick up a job and remember that life continues to go on in every corner of the world. Still, I continue to be frequently amused at how delightfully strange the relationship between client and translator can be, particularly in the digital age. We've all picked a rather curious profession to pursue. ;D

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    Katrina Paterson

    What a lovely story, Ellie! It's amazing how translation offers us this tantalising glimpse into other people's worlds, and in your case, it's humbling to think how much of an impact a translation can make on that other person's world. I also really like the idea of the translation bridging the communication barrier at an international wedding. Amazing!

    I (and I'm sure many of us) have translated quite a few CVs and I always find that experience quite intriguing, too. There's something weirdly compelling at having this brief little window into another person's life: their background, achievements, aspirations and so on. And then, like you say, the window closes again and we never find out whether the person got the job or accomplished what they set out to. I guess we can always hope that they did, and that our translation for them helped! 

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    rocypa

    My favorite project so far has been the translation of texts obtained from social networks and the Internet for the training of an artificial intelligence system. I chose it because I work with this kind of system and because social media have a very peculiar language, it looks like a new language!

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    Katrina Paterson

    That's very interesting, Rocypa! Do you find social media language easy to understand? I have to admit that I often have to look things up that I read on social media in my language (English). Especially the acronyms! It's interesting how much social media has changed people's conversational style, and yes, it can feel like a new language sometimes. I'm glad you liked the project!

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